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DRILL PRESS
Setup and Features
Drill Bits
Drill Press Safety
Drill Press Speeds
Laying Out the Work
Supporting the Work
General Drilling
Drilling at an Angle
Drilling Using Special Setups
Drilled Moldings
Metal Drilling
Drilling Plastics

Drill Press
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Pg. 1-3, Pg 4-6, Pg 7-9, Pg 10-12,
Pg 13-15, Pg 16-18, Pg 19-21, Pg 22-24

Drilling at an Angle

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Figure 7-29. Angular hole are drilled by tilting the table and using the rip fence as a guide and for support. Use a backup when drilling holes through the workpiece.

To drill a hole at any angle between 45° and 90°, simply tilt the table. When the table is tilted, mount the rip fence on the "down" side of the table (Figure 7-29) or use clamps. This will give the workpiece the maximum support.

Angular holes in round work require an arrangement that keeps the work from turning while the hole locations have the same edge distance and are on a common centerline. V-blocks and stock are usually clamped to the table so the work can't be turned. Since the miter gauge can be locked in the table slot, it may be used together with a straight piece of wood to improvise a V-block that permits accurate drilling (Figure 7-30). The same type of setup can be used to drill angular holes in square workpieces (Figure 7-31).

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Figure 7-30. Control accuracy when drilling angular holes in circular pieces by using the v-block arrangement shown here.
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Figure 7-31. To a limited extent, the V-block setup can be used to drill angular holes in square workpieces.

 

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Figure 7-32. On sharp angles, the side of the bit may contact the workpiece before the bit center does. This can cause the bit to drift off center. A leveling block will solve the problem.

It is good practice to work with a leveling block when the angle you need is sharp (Figure 7-32). On such work, the side of the bit may contact the work before the point does. This can cause the bit to drift off center. The block, when it is used as shown in Figure 7-33, establishes a center for the bit even before it touches the work, thus assuring that the hole location will be correct.

 

 

 

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Figure 7-33. The point of the bit will contact the leveling block before it touches the work. Thus it can't move away from where you want it to drill.

 

V-Block Drilling

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Figure 7-34. The table and the fence, positioned this way, make a perfect V-block for holding a workpiece that requiares diametrically accurate holes. Line the"V" with scrap blocks when drilling holes through the workpiece.

The table and fence can be situ-ated as shown in Figure 7-34 when you need to drill diametrically into or through round material. Tilt the table to 45° and then adjust it and the fence position so the point of the bit will exactly bisect the "V." If you need more than one hole on the same centerline, mark the workpiece so the bit point can be correctly positioned each time. For through holes, line the "V" with lengths of scrap wood. The same setup and procedure can be used when you need to drill holes in the corners of square stock (Figure 7-35). Make the initial contact slowly and carefully so the bit won't move off center.

 

 

 

 

 

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Figure 7-35. The V-block arrangement is also suitable when you need holes in one or more corners of square materials. Feed the bit very slowly when you make initial contact.

 

Continue to Drilling Using Special Setups
Back to General Drilling

 

 

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